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Mary Davidek
 
August 21, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Rosé—A Dozen Pairings Picked

If you’ve attended the Royal Food and Wine Pairing at Castello di Amorosa it comes as no surprise --you know my affection for Gioia, Castello di Amorosa’s Rosato of Sangiovese. Perhaps one of the most versatile food wines available as the pairing possibilities for a well-made rosé are seemingly endless. Traditionally, rosé wines are dry, light, and fruity and carry appeal for white and red wine drinkers. Any black-skinned grape can be made into a blush or rosé wine. The longer the skins remain in contact with the juice and pulp, the more pigment is imparted and, thus, the redder the juice or wine becomes. Rosé is produced by limiting the contact of the skins of black grapes with the juice; for Gioia, it is approximately 36 hours. As we weather the dog-days of summer and celebrate with picnics, grill parties and backyard entertaining, Rosé indeed seems to be on everybody’s mind…and palate. This is a perfect opportunity to explore the aforementioned ‘pairing possibilities’.

Let’s put my theory to the test…let the pairings begin!

Castello di Amorosa’s Gioia, Rosato of Sangiovese has a bright and beautiful salmon colored hue. Serve this chilled rosé with tasty apps or a light and seasonal dinner.

 

                                            

Full-bodied rosé wines are a great match for terrines, pate, and Italian salumi. The fruit notes of Gioia compliment the gamey meats and the acidity provides just enough ‘zip’ to cut through the fattiness of these tasty selections.

                 

Roasted red pepper hummus is a yummy app with a chilled rosé.

 

                                                 

Olive-based tapenades with anchovies, capers and light vinegar are prolific in Italian cuisine. The saltiness of the olives is a perfect back drop for fruity Gioia.

Forget the margaritas! Salsa provides a hint (or a lot!) of spice—cool crisp Gioia with the tomatoes and cilantro atop a salty tortilla chip is delicious. Yo tengo chips and salsa!

                                               

No time to make a caprese salad..no problem. Caprese bites are a quick and easy alternative.

 

A favorite on the Royal Food and Wine Pairing menu, cream of tomato basil soup. A touch of cumin adds Mediterranean flair and chilled Gioia is a refreshing contrast to this warming comfort soup.

                                                          

Margherita Pizza is named for the first Queen of modern Italy, Margherita De Savoia-(l85l-l926). Margherita pizza is a thin crust pizza with tomatoes, mozzarella and basil. For a peppery freshness, try it topped with leaves of arugula. Thank you Queen Margherita, you would have loved this pizza with Castello’s Italian style Rosato of Sangiovese, Gioia.

                          

Hot wings and Gioia was my husband’s favorite pairing. This duo takes me back to circa 1985 ordering buffalo wings and a bottle of chilled white Zin! I was definitely on to something—fruit and spice makes everything nice!

                                                       

Pasta with marinara sprinkled with Asiago and served with Gioia was a simple meal on a hot summer evening.

Research suggests that eating oily fish once or twice a week may increase your lifespan by more than two years and reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease up to 35 percent. That combined with a relaxing glass of wine and we may have found the fountain of youth! I loved the grilled smokiness of the delicate salmon meat which was complemented by the crisp berry burst of Gioia. This healthy pairing was incredible; grilled sockeye salmon from our friends at Great Alaska Seafood  http://www.great-alaska-seafood.com

                                             

A cool watermelon salad tossed in cold pressed grape seed oil and light vinaigrette. Flavorful red onion and a few crumbles of feta combine for a surprising palate of sweet, salty and tangy. Castello di Amorosa’s Gioia completed this palate of fruity crispness.

Kanpai! Talk about a mixed marriage! Rosé is a natural for exotic spices.

 

Time Posted: Aug 21, 2013 at 11:04 AM
Mary Davidek
 
August 5, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Reductions ....Simplified

The dictionary defines reduction as the act or process of reducing. This is concise and fairly straightforward. In the kitchen, reductions are equally concise and straightforward. Reducing is simply the process of thickening a liquid i.e. soup, sauce, wine etc. by heating. This slowly causes evaporation thereby intensifying the flavor of the liquid. Using a pan without a lid is preferable (which allows the vapors to escape) until the desired volume is reached.


For this segment and by popular demand (Thanks, Rose!) I am going to specifically address balsamic vinegar reduction.


There won’t be much more except a note from personal experience. Reducing balsamic vinegar makes me look like a culinary genius (thanks, balsamic & heat!) and it is a great way to add richness, texture, and sweetness to savories and desserts. It elevates the ordinary.

As my grandmother said, "alla gioccia".. good to the last drop!

Ready…. set…..reduce…..

Cheers!

Mary Davidek C.S., C.S.W.

 

Ingredients, just 1. A good quality balsamic need not be expensive.  Castello di Amorosa balsamic is delicious and affordable at $18 per 500ml

Ingredients; just 1. A good balsamic need not be expensive.  Castello di Amorosa balsamic is delicious and affordable at $18 per 500ml.

 

Reduce over medium-low heat to just under a simmer; approximately 195 degrees seems the optimum temperature. Use a large pan so the vapors can evaporate more rapidly. Increase stirring as it thickens.

 

500 ml or 17.25 ounces reduced to 4.5 ounces in slightly more than 1 hour. Store at room temperature or refrigerate for up to one year.

The perfect complement for a caprese salad.

Baked chicken breast with balsamic reduction.
After removing the chicken from the oven, they were finished in the reduction pan which gave the chicken a delicious balsamic coating.

Berries drizzled with balsamic reduction topped with a dollop of fresh whipped cream. The acid in the berries evokes a dark chocolate note from the balsamic.        

Firm cheese like Piave Vecchio or Pecorino dipped into a balsamic reduction adds just the right sweetness to these salty cheeses. The 2009 Il Brigante has a bit of Malbec which heightens the jammy notes of this cabernet blend.

 

                                                             

This decadent dessert is a tasty surprise for the palate. Double dark chocolate gelato with balsamic reduction adds just a touch of savory. Sprinkle with salted almonds and all the bases of the palate are covered with this rich finale.

 

                                                       

 

Time Posted: Aug 5, 2013 at 8:46 PM
Mary Davidek
 
July 3, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Red, White and Bleu …… Let Freedom Ring!

Red, White and Bleu …… Let Freedom Ring!
Freedom; no single word in the English language is more synonymous with America. Case in point, "Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness" is a well-known phrase in the United States Declaration of Independence as is inalienable rights which the Declaration says all human beings have been given. Even when certain ‘dry” movements (prohibition 1920-1933) threatened one inalienable right, the powers that be eventually restored this right and true freedom was reinstated.
Without starting a political debate, let’s just talk about the fun stuff! We have the right to eat what we like and drink what we choose. In the United States we boast more than 3,700 certified wineries and in Napa, there are more than 450 wineries in this relatively tiny valley. It is obvious happiness has been justly pursued. For the purpose of this blog and this holiday let’s concentrate on a quintessentially American if not, Californian grape; Zinfandel.
Also known as Primitivo, Zinfandel is planted in nearly 15% of all California’s vineyards. Many debates have ensued as to who can rightly lay claim to this popular cultivar’s origination but DNA fingerprinting revealed it is genetically equivalent to Croatian grapes (which I will spare you the pronunciation of) as well as the Primitivo variety traditionally grown in the Puglia region of Italy. Eventually, this grape found its way to the United States in the mid-19th century, and became known by the name "Zinfandel". Zinfandel thrives in Napa’s Mediterranean climate as well as other growing regions of California. Geographical and climatic differences are expressive and many; robust and tannic, fruity and candied, complex and aromatic.
As stated, this is about fun, freedom and the right to pursue both. This 4th of July, you will find me celebrating the red, white and blue with another red, white and bleu. Castello di Amorosa Zinfandel (Primitivo) and a yummy burger off the grill. I like 2 cheeses to top my burger, a little white cheddar for creaminess on the palate and a few bleu cheese crumbles for a salty zing. With all the usual burger suspects present and accounted for-- this red white and bleu is perfect to get you in the mood for a night of fireworks.
Happy 4th of July—Let Freedom Ring!
Mary Davidek, C.S., C.S.W.

 


Everything for our decadent 4th of July burgers.
Remember, on the grill or the stove--160 degrees is the safety zone for hamburger.

 

 

Castello di Amorosa's Zinfandel from Russian River Valley is spicy and fruity with hints of potpourri and dried Bing Cherries. Just big and bright enough for the Bleu and Cheddar.

 


Happiness pursued and achieved--enjoy with your firework spectacular!

Time Posted: Jul 3, 2013 at 11:24 PM
Alison Cochrane
 
June 10, 2013 | Alison Cochrane

"Stay Rad Wine Blog" reviews our 2012 Pinot Grigio and 2011 Anderson Valley Pinot Noir

Recently, Jeff of "Stay Rad Wine Blog" came "back to the Castle" to review our 2012 Mendocino County Pinot Grigio, pairing it with a scrumptious looking Mac n' Cheese. Here's what he had to say:

"Color: Very pale yellow.  Think of the color of hay.

"Nose: Massive amounts of honeysuckle (maybe due to the 3.8 g/L of residual sugar) create a nice backdrop for the green apple and honeydew fruits.  The nose isn’t overly sweet.  There are plenty of wet rocks to balance everything out.

"Taste: There is a surprisingly nice petrol note to this wine which provides for a very fun, viscous mouthfeel.  As with most Pinot Grigios, there is a brightly acidic backbone to this wine that delivers a variety of citrus fruit flavors of lemon and lime zest.  There is a nice combination of honey and minerality at play here too.

"Score: I get it.  Castello di Amorosa makes wines consisting of mainly Italian varieties of grapes, and no self-respecting “Italian” winery would ever label a bottle as “Pinot Gris”, but… This is not one of those ordinary, 20-dollar, flat-lemon-lime-soda-tasting, Italian Pinot Grigios that have been taking over your local super market in recent years.  This drinks like one of those rich, subtle, and intriguing Oregonian Pinot Gris that I have been grooving on in recent months.  Stylistically, these guys have done everything right with the grape they call the “Grey Pine”.  At 87+ points, you may want to introduce this Pinot Grigio to your favorite housewife."

Check out the rest of his review on his blog here, and be sure to scroll down to see his fantastic comments about our 2011 Anderson Valley Pinot Noir as well! 

Mary Davidek
 
May 19, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Merlot, Part 2 - A Sideways Glance

The night of our 2010 Castello Holiday Party I was seated at a table with executive winemaker Brooks Painter.  As dessert was served, a decadent Bouche Noelle, we were contemplating our next pour.  No small task!  Lovers of the sweet anxiously awaited the succulent Late Harvest Gewurztraminer.  Tempting.  However, in the corner of the rooms I saw a bottle of something red.  To my delight it was the highly anticipated 2006 Castello di Amorosa Merlot.  Rich chocolate goodness with Merlot?  Brooks and I agreed; Yes, please!  We toasted another great year and then…..Silence as we took a moment to contemplate the wine.  This Merlot was stellar.  Heavy intoxicating aromatics with a smooth velvety palate of bittersweet cocoa and blackberries.  I asked Brooks where the fruit was sourced from as it differed from the past fruit-driven Merlots of Castello.  For the 2006 Merlot Brooks brought in fruit from vineyards near the south end of the Napa Valley, closer to the San Pablo Bay and the fog that rolls in off the Pacific.  Made sense.  Cooler vineyard sites allow the fruit to mature slowly while maintaining structure and natural acidity.  Our admiration was well-deserved as the 2006 Castello di Amorosa release was voted one of the best Napa Valley Merlots of the vintage.

Merlot: typically more approachable than Cabernet Sauvignon, more versatile with food – what’s with all the bad press? (pun intended)  Some of my most memorable 'wine dinners’ have prominently featured this viticultural also-ran.  Later that night my thoughts turned to past Merlot Super Moments. This trip down memory lane required a bit of travel.
First stop: Italy.  Although not specifically known for great Merlot, a few standouts are indeed vino Italiano.  Tuscany’s  Galatrona Petrolo and Masseto by Ornellaia are two of the finest expressions of Merlot I’ve had.  Unfortunately price and availability can be prohibitive.  For lovely lush Italian Merlot that won’t break the bank, travel north to the Friuli-Venezia region.  Livio Felluga produces Merlot that never disappoints.  For approximately $20 this luxurious red is perfect with slow braised fork-tender short ribs and mushroom risotto…..listen closely…..those are angels singing. 

Now, across the globe to South America.  Chile is now the 4th largest exporter of wine to the U.S. and has 33,000 acres planted to Merlot.  (2nd most planted varietal to Cabernet Sauvignon of course).  I went to a BBQ last summer and brought a few bottles of one of my favorites from this exciting region; Santa Ema.  This $10 Merlot has and edge and is always met with approval.  Turns out this southern hemisphere bottling works great with spice rubbed grilled chicken quarters.

And back to where it all began: France.  Not only is Merlot the most planted varietal in the country, in the Bordeaux region Merlot accounts for 172,000 acres planted compared to Cabernet Sauvignon’s 72,000.  In St. Emilion, 70% of all planted grapes are Merlot.  Wines from this region, although Merlot dominant, are primarily blends; they embody elegance and restraint.  Be adventurous….pick up a few right-bank’ers in the $30-$40 range and enjoy with roast leg of lamb or grilled duck breast.  Two of my favorites: Chateau Monbousquet and Chateau Tertre Roteboeuf, my favorite prime roast beef wine.

I applaud and encourage all global explorations of this soft maligned varietal.  In Napa Valley, where Merlot excels at higher elevations and cooler vineyard sites, this once exploited grape is being produced with new vigor and excitement.

Be adventurous and in your endeavors may you find out why Merlot is said to be the “flesh on the Cabernet Sauvignon’s bones.”

Cheers!

Mary Davidek  C.S, C.S.W

 

Mary Davidek
 
May 4, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Merlot, Part 1 - A Sideways Glance

I have always rooted for the underdog, drawn to the dark horse; sure things and odds on favorites need not apply…..My Dad would have said being a Dodger fan has taken its toll.  And so it goes; when it comes to wines my preference also leans to the runner-up.  I often pass on the popular choice and instead, opt for its viticulture next of kin.  When Cabernet Sauvignon is what’s for dinner, trust I will be sipping Merlot.

Not to say dark brooding Cabernet isn’t tempting with its flirtatious undertones of blackberry, cassis, dark cherry and chocolate…..wait…..am I describing Merlot?  Yes.  In fact, on a palate chart Cabernet and Merlot are kissing cousins and easily confused.  If you want to have some fun, (admittedly wine-geeky fun) invite a few friends for a blind-tasting featuring Cabernet and Merlot.  Make certain the wines are of similar pedigree, bottles in the $25 to $45 price range offer worthy contenders.  Castello di Amorosa’s 2006 and 2008 Merlot are two of my favorite wines produced by Brooks Painter and his Castello team.  Put these beauties in the lineup and even in the presence of well-seasoned palates, I predict a dead heat; a 50/50 split.  In tasting panels Merlot is said to possess a softness or a roundness not typically associated with Cabernet.  Why then the ridicule for this benevolent cultivar, which is, in fact, the most widely planted grape in all of France!? (Sacre bleu).  Truth be told, Merlot is prolific in many regions and quite possibly this is at the root of its undoing.

Merlot could wear the banner "Just Because You Can Grow Something Doesn’t Mean You Should" but we’ll cover geography in Part 2.  This over-abundance and plenitude eventually lead to Merlot becoming the marketing darling of the 90’s.  Finally a wine our thick American tongues could pronounce.  (I wonder how many “peanut noyas” were ordered?)  Restaurants eagerly filled their wine lockers with this fashionable red.  However, this trend ran its course as the over-planted Merlot often bordered on insipid rather than inspiring and earned a “sideways” glance.

Seemingly overnight Merlot became ‘persona non grata’ in tasting rooms as an often quoted movie line rang through the wine country.  Out went Merlot and in came the next grape of favor. (shh, don’t tell me chateau Petrus!)

Well, fear not Merlot loving readers!  Merlot is back with a vengeance and it’s better than ever.  Next I’ll cover a few regions that are cultivating this classic with new vigor and excitement.

Until then, go drink some Merlot!

Cheers!

Mary Davidek C. S., S.W.

 

Julie Ann Kodmur
 
April 18, 2013 | Julie Ann Kodmur

2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay is the St. Helena Star's Wine of the Week

Wine of the Week: Castello di Amorosa 2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay

This is a crowd-pleaser of a chardonnay. It has nice aromas of vanilla and toffee along with flavors of red apple, pear and spice, which will appeal to lovers of oak-influenced chardonnays. Yet the wine is not over-oaked. It is balanced with a freshness that allows fans of crisper white wines to appreciate it as well. With this chardonnay ($28), you won’t need to stress over which style to choose for your next dinner party.

Not only does Castello di Amorosa’s winemaker, Brooks Painter, continue to roll out beautiful wines, but the winery’s schedule is jam-packed with fun events. Next weekend there is the Ragin’ Cajun Party followed by a Midsummer Medieval Festival, and then Hot Havana Nights — among many others. It is likely you will find something intriguing!

You can read the full article in the Napa Valley Register here

 

 

Mary Davidek
 
March 6, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Corkage Fees and BYOB – Part 2

In the last submission I covered the basics of getting your wine to the restaurant.  Now, for the dedicated corkage seekers……..let’s continue.


Take care of the waitstaff.  Many experienced servers see a bottle carried in and mark you as a diner who is…….well……thrifty.  I prefer to call it savvy.  And when addressing the monetary side of it, I usually MYOB but regarding BYOB; I can’t hold back.  If service warrants a generous gratuity, include an additional percentage for the server to off-set their loss of a potential wine sale.  I usually include an extra 5%.  In a more intimate dining setting I offer the server, or chef, or other interested staff a small sample of the wine.  If you frequent a particular restaurant, develop a rapport with your favorite server.  A big bonus, many times the published corkage fee disappears.


When possible I patronize restaurants with lenient BYOB practices or those that do not charge corkage…..EVER!  Be on the lookout for specials or promotions.  One of our favorite Napa spots offers “No Corkage Mondays”.  Some wineries have partnered with local restaurants who offer complimentary corkage if you bring in a bottle purchased at the referring winery.  Castello di Amorosa has a list of at least 20 restaurants in the valley that are happy to open a bottle of Castle wine at no charge.  And kudos to Restaurant Cuvée in Napa and Farmstead in St. Helena, CA; a small corkage fee is charged and donated to charity.  Bravo!


Become active on sites like Yelp and Trip Advisor to give feedback and accolades.  Wine forums are also a great place to turn.  Check out WineSpectator.com, VinoCellar.com and RobertParker.com; you will find lively and well-informed participants as well as updated BYOB info.


As previously mentioned, there has never been a better time to dine out with wine as more restaurants and chefs are embracing BYOB diners.  States that had prohibited BYOB in the past are now loosening laws and restrictions.  Establishments that at one time discouraged corkage enthusiasts are now recognizing the valuable business this clientele provides.


Happy dining –


Cheers!
Mary Davidek C.S., C.S.W

Time Posted: Mar 6, 2013 at 4:46 PM
Mary Davidek
 
February 21, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Corkage Fees and BYOB – Part 1

BYOB = Bring Your Own Bottle
Corkage Fee = the fee charged to open and serve a bottle of wine not purchased at the dining establishment


Every restaurant has restrictions and specifications which are said to cover the cost of opening a bottle, providing stemware, and serving the wine.  Realistically, a corkage fee is charged to cover lost revenue.  I am unabashedly a self-professed BYOB junkie; a dedicated corkage hound ……and I go to extremes in my pursuit.  Here are a few situations I have encountered and simple resolutions which may help in your quest.


1.  Call the restaurant or check their website prior to your reservation as fees and restrictions vary.  Some restaurants may impose a 1-bottle limit and others may have more tempting ways to capture your attention.   A growing trend; restaurants charge a fee but will comp it one for one, for every bottle purchased.  For example, restaurant “X” charged $25 corkage.  I brought in a bottle of Castello di Amorosa Cabernet Sauvignon.  From the restaurant wine list I selected a bottle of Sauvignon Blanc to enjoy with apps.  I love a zippy Sauvignon Blanc with bruschetta and goat cheese on a warm baguette; sublime.  The bottle I purchased was $28.  That’s right, the corkage fee for my Castello di Amorosa bottle was waived.  This is clearly a win-win.  Typically I bring in a red and purchase a white from the list as even the grandest wine menu offers a tasty and affordable white wine.


2.  A common and reasonable request;  the bottle you bring in cannot be available for purchase on the existing wine list.  To ensure your selection for carry-in is acceptable, browse the wine list on-line or request a fax or emailed copy prior to your planned visit.  Here is my fool-proof solution.  Bring in wine from a winery that does not distribute.  This is becoming easier as more small and mid-sized wineries are opting for direct-to –consumer sales only.  Castello di Amorosa  wines have been a fixture on my restaurant outings for this very reason.  Restaurant wine lists change weekly and this takes the guess work out of it.


3. Prepare your bottles.  If you want a chilled bottle of bubbly with your Dungeness crab; chill it.  If you are bringing a Napa Cab with a little age on it, stand it up for a few hours prior to leaving which allows sediment to collect at the bottom.


4. I have seen bottles transported in everything from a paper shopping tote to a plastic grocery bag.  My advice; invest in a respectable wine carrier.  From leather totes to canvas carrying bags to decorative wine boxes – your wine should travel in style.

Good news for us food and wine lovers, corkage and BYOB is becoming an accepted standard.  Restaurant owners are adopting more favorable corkage policies as a marketing tool. 


Stay tuned……Part 2 coming up.

Cheers!
Mary Davidek C. S. , C.S.W.
 

Mary Davidek
 
February 11, 2013 | Mary Davidek

Perfect Pairings Dynamic Duo

The first time I saw the man who would eventually become my husband I was dumb-struck (quite a confession those who know me will attest).  Just my type; tall, dark (it was summer), and handsome.  After a chat over a glass of vino (what else?), I made the fatal mistake of telling him I thought he was smarter than I was.  I say fatal mistake as it is now 24 years later and he won’t let me forget that statement. 


Our friends often tell us they have never met 2 people more suited for each other, meant to be together.  Better together as 1 than separate as 2.  Like peanut butter and jelly, milk and cookies, peas and carrots……it just works.


Perfect pairings certainly enhance and intensify and one thing which is singularly good, but with food and wine, perfect pairings take on a new meaning.  If you have ever been on the Royal Pairing Tour at Castello di Amorosa you may have experienced a few of these perfect pairings.  A rich pate’ with Castello’s award winning Il Passito comes to mind.  Sommeliers agree this match is perfection.  Popular wine writer Karen Macneil says “this luxurious pairing comes perilously close to maxing out the human tolerance for pleasure”.  An endorsement like that certainly piques the imagination.  But, must perfect pairings always be so lofty, and quite candidly, so costly to be perfect?  Does perfection have a price?  A rule of thumb, pair rich with rich and humble with humble.  One of my affordable favorites, a simple roast chicken (any grocery store’s rotisserie is fine), and a bottle of Pinot Noir.  The rustic flavors of a simple roast chicken, a loaf of crusty bread and the earthy tones of Pinot Noir are magical together.  When selecting your pinot go for light and fruity bottlings from Sonoma.  For my dollar Castello’s Los Carneros Pinot Noir is the perfect choice with a hit of clove balanced with bright fruit.  This Valentine’s Day, a day dedicated to perfect pairings, celebrate this dynamic duo with your honey.  Light a couple of candles, put in your favorite music, pour a couple glasses of vino and relax.
Throughout the year, connect with your inner match-maker; go forth and discover new and exciting pairings.


And remember, perfection is in the eyes of the beholder……


Cheers and Happy Valentine’s Day


Mary Davidek C.S., C.S. W

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